'Vindication'

Todd Terry and Peggy Schott step into their roles of Detective Travis and Becky Travis in episode 7 of the Amazon Prime series “Vindication.”

A Seguin resident is making big waves in Hollywood facing the undead and criminals on television screens.

Peggy Schott is no stranger to working on set. She recently premiered in an episode of AMC’s “Fear The Walking Dead” as Tess — a reoccurring role.

“It’s a physically demanding role,” Schott said. “They started filming my scenes in April or May, there were a few days where it was chilly, but it was starting to get hot, and almost everything is shot outside. We actually just filmed an upcoming episode in Gonzalez that comes out this Sunday. What amazes me is the people who play the zombies who are in the heat in that makeup. They do an amazing job.”

As a relative newcomer to the zombie thriller and a longtime fan of the show, Schott was speechless when she learned she acquired the role.

“I sent in my audition tape … a few days later I got a message from my agent that said I got the part,” she said. “I read that message four times, because I was shocked and I finally realized that he really meant it. My husband and I have been huge fans of the show, so to book this one has been really cool and exciting for me.”

When she isn’t busy hunting zombies as Tess, Schott also plays the lead role of Becky Travis in the recently released Amazon Prime series “Vindication.”

“It is a faith-based crime drama,” Schott said. “What I love about the series is that it’s not a typical faith-based show. The messages in it are very subtle, and it deals with very heavy subject matter, but it deals with it in a way where they don’t use curse words or show sex or violence. It’s something that you can watch with your older children and open up conversations.

Each episode is only around 20 minutes long, and they have a positive message to it.”

Schott says that some may shy away from the sight of a faith-based crime drama, however, she says “Vindication” takes a more raw approach to the subject matter.

“I think oftentimes when people think of faith-based productions they think they are a little too preachy and little too cheesy,” she said. “This is definitely more real. It’s a whole lot more realistic in dealing with life. There are many things that go on in the show, and there just happens to be some Christian characters in it.”

Originally from New Orleans, Schott made the move to the area several years ago and now lives here part-time.

“I’ve been living in Austin for many years, and two years ago my husband and I bought a place here in Seguin, and we’ve been going back and forth ever since,” Schott said. “Recently, we have been spending more and more time here so we are planning on making this a permanent home someday. I saw a TV show that talked about the Guadalupe River, and it interested us so we came to town, and we really enjoyed being here so much.”

Schott credits her experiences living in Seguin and it’s surrounding areas as an inspiration to her roles.

“My character in FWD — Tess — is from Texas. She and her husband lived on a ranch in Texas so I suppose it does help me make a connection,” she said. “I did shoot and direct a short film here in Seguin called ‘Lauries Poem’ … it’s based on a poem that happens to be a true story, and it takes place in a small Texas town in 1956. When I read the poem, I instantly thought of Seguin.”

 

Joe Martin is a staff writer for the Seguin Gazette. You can e-mail him at joe.martin@seguingazette.com .

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