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The use of fear to drive votes and actions is a common tactic employed by Republicans to divert attention from real issues or to distort the conversation in order to achieve their ends even when it isn’t in the best interests of the average American. As usual, Republicans are doing their bes…

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Once upon a time, politics in America was about America, what was perceived as good for America, both fiscally and morally. Sure, mistakes were made. Our country adjusted and moved forward, pulling our pants up, putting on our boots and going to work making our homeland an industrial giant, …

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As voters in 10 Texas counties went to the polls on April 10, 1937, to pick a new congressman, the youngest candidate on the ballot spent the day in a hospital bed.

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There are so many people who move into a community, live there all their lives, work, raise their families, then pass away, soon all but forgotten except by family members. Many of these people have an impact in the positive growth of the community, but are often not recognized in our histor…

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It’s crazy to think that it has been slightly more than a year since the first Texas resident tested positive for COVID-19. At the same time that states were reporting the same or more cases, the country went on lockdown.

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Recently, my husband Adam has been on a documentary kick. I like an occasional documentary, but I lean toward topics involving the hard sciences while he’s more intrigued with primates. But we found one documentary topic we both enjoyed — robots.

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As we head into a new administration, and policy shifts begin, it is probably a good idea to discuss how government policies affect the economic landscape we see around us. President Biden, as a Democrat, sees a strong role for government in managing the national economy. To be honest, so di…

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The Republican-controlled legislature in Georgia passed new voter suppression measures aimed at minority voters a few weeks ago under to the guise of protecting against voter fraud. If that’s really what it was about, they wouldn’t have included measures such as criminalizing handing out bot…

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During the first week of April 1829, Sam Houston sent his teenaged bride home to mother, decided to resign as governor of Tennessee and prepared for a self-imposed exile among his boyhood friends, the Cherokees.

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Although born in Switzerland slightly more than 200 years ago, and educated in Germany as a theologian and ecclesiastical scholar, Philip Schaff lived most of his life writing and teaching here in the United States. His countless essays, speeches and sermons are still widely quoted today all…

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One year ago last month, the first Texan died of complications related to COVID-19 in Matagorda County. Since then, coronavirus has taken more than 48,500 lives in Texas, out of 2.78 million confirmed cases, and almost 2.75 million have recovered from the virus. So far, more than 11 million …

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As we celebrate the return of spring and the commemoration of Easter, we are reminded of the importance of connections and community. As a community of faith and learning, Texas Lutheran University connects with the world beyond our campus in multiple ways every day, recognizing that communi…

We’ve taken a trip out of town for a few days, exploring a place outside the four walls we’ve been surrounded by for so long. We’ve all had our first COVID vaccination (finally all these pre-existing conditions are paying off), and while we know we aren’t anywhere near as invincible as we’d …

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This week a colleague in the microwave telephone business died. Not from a work-related accident, but from a fall in his own driveway. It has caused me to reflect upon our ever-present enemy Death, who we meet only once!

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Taking even the most cursory of glances at the political landscape today can lead to only one conclusion: America is the most divided it’s been since it went to war with itself over 100 years ago. Civil political discussion seems to be a thing of the past. It has gotten to the point where I …

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Due to COVID restrictions and obstruction by the big liberal city fathers, the Republican Party of Texas decided late last year that we would take our executive committee meetings to the smaller cities. We decided to go to cities that wanted our business and would work to meet our needs and …

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You know who really impresses me? The people who invented zip ties. I realize this sounds crazy, but hear me out.

Years ago, when I was a kid, zip ties were for one thing in our house and one thing only. Garbage bags. That was what zip ties were for, as far as I knew. These weren’t exactly like modern zip ties — they were flat strips with triangular cuts that you pulled one end of the strip through, but the principal was the same. I remember everyone was pretty excited to use them on garbage bags back then. You could finally toss your garbage into the trash can with some style and not accidentally redecorate the lawn.

Little did I know, these little plastic strips had a much more glamorous purpose when they were first invented. Zip ties, it turns out, were originally designed to hold wires together on aircraft. Thankfully, I never came across wires I needed to secure in an airplane. If there is one sign that your airline trip is not going well it’s that you suddenly see all the zip ties being used to hold things together.

Zip ties came up because the other day Mireya, our youngest, was visiting, and showed us her latest sewing project. She had handcrafted a beautiful corset complete with the stiff little bits that keep its shape.

“You know what they are?” she asked me as she spun around. “Usually you’d use boning, but these are …” she paused for dramatic effect, “zip ties!”

I couldn’t believe it. Turns out the rigidness of a zip tie was a perfect match for the more expensive and harder to come by traditional boning.

Before I knew it,, we started talking about zip ties and how you can use them for all kinds of things. I had an odd little crown that uses them. We used them on our fence when we were trying to thwart Archer from his frequent illegal departures from the yard. And these days they are used in law enforcement. Before long we made the very logical transition from “cool corset” to “how hard is it to break out of zip tie handcuffs, do you think?”

I try very hard to maintain a neutral expression when my children ask me these kinds of questions. I find that it’s the best approach.

A quick internet search gave us some plausible ways to escape and we moved on. As did the zip tie industry, having even developed a design that is used when surgeons are re-sectioning a kidney. A kidney!

So my hat’s off to you, zip tie industry. You didn’t rest on your laurels. You weren’t happy just keeping the planes in the air or garbage off the lawn. Now, if you could maybe address other problems, like how to keep the lights on in Texas when it gets cold or how to keep me from looking for my glasses when they are on my head, I would appreciate it.

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Kid Curry, the most dangerous member of the Wild Bunch, shot a total stranger and left him to die in the dust while passing through a West Texas town on March 27, 1901.

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After calling my name out loud at least three times, according to my wife, I finally responded from my chair on our patio. “Didn’t you hear me? I swear I believe you’re going deaf,” she announced to me clearly.

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This time 10 years ago, we were preparing for the birth of our second son, Mason. It’s hard to remember a time before we had kids, but this boy stole our hearts and energy the minute he entered this world.

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Q. My nectar producing plants were basically flattened by the freezes in February. Do you have any ideas about meeting the needs of the Monarchs and other pollinators for nectar this spring? Is there any chance that the usual nectar sources such as milkweed and mistflower will recover in time?

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The U.S. House has passed H.R. 5 — the “Equality Act.” If this bill is passed into law, protections for men and women, the way God created them, will be eliminated. Men will not just be allowed, but protected by law, to use female restrooms and to compete in female sports in all public arena…

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It has been a year since the state of Texas and school districts across the state mandated that all classes be conducted through remote learning. Some districts are continuing with this policy. Others have modified the policy by only allowing students currently passing to continue with onlin…

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A few days ago, I had decided what I was going to write about. I had recently headed out and bought several sacrificial items to offer to the weather fates, also known as “plants.” My plan was to, for the good of the community, bring spring to life by planting, and soon after accidentally ki…

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Mannen Clements, Sr. decided to take a break from politicking on March 23, 1887, and stepped into a Ballinger barroom for a refreshing drink. What he got instead was a deadly barrage of bullets.

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Last week, Comedy Central aired the second one-hour television special of “South Park” that tackles the COVID pandemic. Ever since their Pandemic Special aired last fall, I’ve been waiting for what the show’s creators would do next. When it was announced that a new special would air, this “S…

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When Governor Abbott designated “election integrity” an emergency item last month, anyone who has paid attention to his rhetoric and that of the rest of the Republican Party knew it was a bad sign. Sure enough after weeks of rumors, Senate Bill 7 was just introduced and it comes as no surpri…

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Q. I know the freeze damage is affecting the regrowth of most plants, does it mean that our St. Augustine and Bermuda lawns are going to be slow to recover this spring? Should we wait to fertilize?

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It’s spring (maybe)! I hate to tempt the frost monster with such a proclamation, but I can’t help myself. There have been too many blue sky days followed by a balmy 70 degrees for me not to believe it’s spring.

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By the third week of March 1967, the sensational scam was the talk of the international art world. A Texas tycoon was the not-so-proud owner of the biggest collection of forgeries on the planet.

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Many names are connected to our early history. Some are easily recognized by streets or buildings named after them. But some names begin here, then move on, and most people today do not realize their early connection to Seguin.

Seguin Magazine