I recently told my high school students in San Antonio there is a deadly chemical compound being used on our campus. After listening to all the information I presented on this compound, my students agreed to sign a petition so that the principal would have this deadly chemical compound removed from our campus. The chemical compound in question is dihydrogen monoxide or DHMO.

DHMO is colorless, odorless, tasteless and kills uncounted thousands of people every year. Most of these deaths are caused by accidental inhalation of DHMO, but the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide do not end there. Prolonged exposure to its solid form causes severe tissue damage.

Symptoms of DHMO ingestion can include excessive sweating and urination, and possibly a bloated feeling, nausea, vomiting and a body electrolyte imbalance. For those who have become dependent on DHMO, withdrawal means certain death. It is also responsible for killing 91 Texas children in 2018.

In spite of all this data, the government has refused to ban the production, distribution or use of this damaging chemical due to its “importance to the economic health of this nation.”

Dihydrogen monoxide is also known as hydroxyl acid and is the major component of acid rain. In its gaseous form, it may cause severe burns. It contributes to the erosion of our natural landscape, and accelerates corrosion and rusting of many metals. It has also been found in excised tumors of terminal cancer patients.

Dihydrogen monoxide is often used as an industrial solvent while mining precious metals. Nuclear power plants use it as a neutron moderator. It is used in the production of styrofoam and is often used as a fire retardant. It is used in pesticides. Even after washing the produce, DHMO contamination can still be found in that food.

For more information about DHMO, visit www.lockhaven.edu/~dsimanek/dhmo.htm , which supplied much of the information used in this column.

After relaying all this troubling information to my class, every one of my students was willing to sign the petition. It was not until I showed them the chemical formula for dihydrogen monoxide that they changed their minds. Dihydrogen means two hydrogen molecules. Monoxide means one oxygen molecule. In short, dihydrogen monoxide is water.

The point of this class exercise was to show that people will use true and factual information to persuade you into believing what they wish you to believe and get you to do what they want you to do. This tactic is used commonly in politics to advance an agenda. The influence of the media is the most powerful force in the world.

Ever since Gutenberg created the printing press to reach the masses with the written word, we have seen (for good and bad) how the media control the paths of our lives. Whether it was dissemination of Gutenberg’s bible, Martin Luther’s edict, Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense,” Hitler’s radio and film broadcasts, Stalin’s propaganda, or even the American media’s presentation of various news stories, the power of the media is controlling the wheel.

One must always be diligent when politicians use the media to make things sound exceptionally great or when they make things sound eminently bad. Chances are, you are being manipulated in some fashion so they can achieve their agenda.

Like I have said many times before in previous articles submitted to the Seguin Gazette, “Don’t believe everything you read. Research everything you read.”

Anthony Cristo was the Libertarian candidate for U.S. Congress in district 15 of Texas.

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