Milo the Robot

Milo is a robot created by Robots4Autism to help students on the autism spectrum with their communication and social skills. This school year Navarro ISD brought Milo to their elemtentary campus to work with the students.

In the last couple of years, educators have incorporated technology in their curriculum and classrooms — whether it’s using iPads in the libraries or online software to introduce students to coding.

We’ve seen it used in some of our local school districts.

Most recently, Navarro ISD took the step to find a innovative way to integrate technology at their elementary campus with a humanoid robot called Milo.

Developed by Robots4Autism, Milo is a non-threatening way for students between the ages of 5 and 17 on the autism spectrum to practice their communication and social skills.

Twice a week for 30 minutes, Milo works individually with some kindergarteners and third graders. So far, Milo’s lessons have focused on how the children can calm themselves down using different strategies such as counting to 10, saying “I’m angry,” taking a break, using a squeeze ball or taking deep breaths.

Milo was obtained using a Title IV grant that focuses on using “innovative and structural technology” in the classroom.

While Navarro ISD only has one Milo robot, there are plans to bring a second one to the Intermediate School using additional grant funds.

Milo may only be one small robot, but he is making a large impact on all of the students at Navarro ISD.

Our Voice is the opinion of the editorial board of the Seguin Gazette.

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