Hanging tag

A yellow tag hangs from a mirror in a car to remind the driver about the young passengers they are carrying.

Summer’s upon us. And, as usual, with it comes increasingly skyrocketing temperatures.

Those temperatures bring with them increasing chances for danger.

Tragedy can strike anytime anywhere. But, as a Guadalupe County official explained, one particular type of tragedy involving children and vehicles can be particularly damaging this time of year.

Children under 15 are more likely to die from heatstroke from being left in a vehicle than from motor vehicle accidents each year, Guadalupe County Fire Marshal and Emergency Management Coordinator Patrick Pinder said.

In less than 10 minutes, the temperature inside a car can increase 20 degrees even with the windows cracked on a mild day, he said.

Children are at risk of heatstroke or heat-related injuries when temperatures in a vehicle reach 107 degrees, Pinder said.

Around these parts, the temperature outside can reach nearly 107 degrees on any given summer day.

The warning signs are there and it is up to adults and young drivers to heed them.

Everyone operating a motor vehicle should look before they lock the doors and make sure no one is in the back seat that could become a victim of heat-related injuries in vehicles. Keeping unattended children away from the dangers of a locked vehicle is a job but it’s one we all need to apply for.

Auto safety is a priority even well after we put the car in park.

Our Voice is the opinion of the editorial board of the Seguin Gazette.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.